darknessandravenclaw:

dont get me wrong i totally fucking love how much tumblr is trying to bring awareness to bisexuality pansexuality and asexuality. but you know what else they need to bring to attention?

  • polysexuality
  • aromanticism
  • people whose sexualities and romantic orienations dont line up

(via theblogofeternalstench)

markus-of-nuttus:

demispooky:

male teachers arent allowed to dress code female students anymore at my school because somebody pointed out that if they had been dress coded for their shorts/skirt being too short or their bra showing by a male teacher, that meant said male teacher was looking at her ass and boobs i am laughing my fucking ass off

where is the lie tho

(via ilmaimait)

me: no one ever texts me

*gets a text*

me: wtf do you want

kafkadress:

crabapple-cove:

daydreamingjellyfish:

M*A*S*H Confession:
 Margaret Houlihan, a strong female lead in any show, a Major even. I always hated how, being such a strong character, went schoolgirl stupid over someone like Frank Burns who bought his way into being a Major.

on the other hand she definitely wasn’t a strong character at the time she fangirled over people like burns.Her character made a huge development from the little insecure girl with daddy issues to an independent women who doesn’t buy the shit men try to give her

One of the reasons I dislike “strong female character” as a term is that it tends to equal “tough, badass woman” instead of “strongly written, multifaceted.” A character can be both. Margaret is both. Even in the beginning of the show, when Margaret was the butt of many, many sexist jokes from the characters and the writers, Loretta Switt found a way to make Margaret more complicated. She showed Margaret’s vulnerabilities and insecurities, her intelligence and shrewdness, her commitment towards her patients (unlike Burns who didn’t give a damn), as well as her kindness towards children in episodes like “Kim.” Did the writing of her character improve over time? Yes, thank god. Did Margaret grow more independent as the show progressed? Absolutely, thank god. But I’d argue she was still one of the strongest characters in the show from the first episode. She fangirled over Burns and she was insecure about her appearance, but she was also an excellent nurse capable of practicing a protective, measured tough love and even at its most sexist the show never questioned that she was deserving of respect in that regard. And of course it got great when she slowly moved from calling out Hawkeye for the way he treated her (I wanna say season 4, “Hepatitis” is the episode…whoa my memory”) to dumping Burns (albeit for Penneboscott) to becoming much more independent. “Strong female character” is effectively worthless as a tool for analyzing a character like Margaret. It’s more useful to evaluate the way the writers of M*A*S*H framed her strength, and how Loretta Switt utilized her character within the frame she was given.  

kafkadress:

crabapple-cove:

daydreamingjellyfish:

M*A*S*H Confession:


Margaret Houlihan, a strong female lead in any show, a Major even. I always hated how, being such a strong character, went schoolgirl stupid over someone like Frank Burns who bought his way into being a Major.

on the other hand she definitely wasn’t a strong character at the time she fangirled over people like burns.
Her character made a huge development from the little insecure girl with daddy issues to an independent women who doesn’t buy the shit men try to give her

One of the reasons I dislike “strong female character” as a term is that it tends to equal “tough, badass woman” instead of “strongly written, multifaceted.” A character can be both. Margaret is both. Even in the beginning of the show, when Margaret was the butt of many, many sexist jokes from the characters and the writers, Loretta Switt found a way to make Margaret more complicated. She showed Margaret’s vulnerabilities and insecurities, her intelligence and shrewdness, her commitment towards her patients (unlike Burns who didn’t give a damn), as well as her kindness towards children in episodes like “Kim.” Did the writing of her character improve over time? Yes, thank god. Did Margaret grow more independent as the show progressed? Absolutely, thank god. But I’d argue she was still one of the strongest characters in the show from the first episode. She fangirled over Burns and she was insecure about her appearance, but she was also an excellent nurse capable of practicing a protective, measured tough love and even at its most sexist the show never questioned that she was deserving of respect in that regard. And of course it got great when she slowly moved from calling out Hawkeye for the way he treated her (I wanna say season 4, “Hepatitis” is the episode…whoa my memory”) to dumping Burns (albeit for Penneboscott) to becoming much more independent. “Strong female character” is effectively worthless as a tool for analyzing a character like Margaret. It’s more useful to evaluate the way the writers of M*A*S*H framed her strength, and how Loretta Switt utilized her character within the frame she was given.  

crabapple-cove:

daydreamingjellyfish:

M*A*S*H Confession:
 Margaret Houlihan, a strong female lead in any show, a Major even. I always hated how, being such a strong character, went schoolgirl stupid over someone like Frank Burns who bought his way into being a Major.

on the other hand she definitely wasn’t a strong character at the time she fangirled over people like burns.Her character made a huge development from the little insecure girl with daddy issues to an independent women who doesn’t buy the shit men try to give her

I don’t think it made her any less of a strong character, since there are women IRL who are in these kinds of situations. Though I really did like the character development in “Comrades in Arms” specifically (albeit an episode I hated) where she receives a letter from her husband meant for another woman.

crabapple-cove:

daydreamingjellyfish:

M*A*S*H Confession:


Margaret Houlihan, a strong female lead in any show, a Major even. I always hated how, being such a strong character, went schoolgirl stupid over someone like Frank Burns who bought his way into being a Major.

on the other hand she definitely wasn’t a strong character at the time she fangirled over people like burns.
Her character made a huge development from the little insecure girl with daddy issues to an independent women who doesn’t buy the shit men try to give her

I don’t think it made her any less of a strong character, since there are women IRL who are in these kinds of situations.
Though I really did like the character development in “Comrades in Arms” specifically (albeit an episode I hated) where she receives a letter from her husband meant for another woman.

(via mashmoments)

m*a*s*h spoilers although the show is over 40 years old so..